About your Search

20121006
20121014
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
because state courts decide the vast majority of the country's legal cases. for "religion & ethics newsweekly," i'm lucky severson in des moines, iowa. >>> in many parts of the country, poor people do not have access to fresh food. such areas are known as food deserts. we have a story today from judy valente about churches and communies in new orleans that are growintheir owfresh food and otherse doing what they can to create what they call food justice. >> this garden is the result of a lot of blood, sweat and tears and hard work in a neighborhood that a bunch of folks had given up on. >> reporter: community activist nat turner is surveying a site people rarely see in the battered ninth ward of new orleans. his community garden provides fruits and vegetables to people hard pressed to find fresh produce in these parts. >> anybody in the neighborhood can come by and some time this morning somebody's going to stop by and say, "you got any okra? you got any creole tomatoes? you got some bell peppers? you got whatever?" and some people just come by the garden and if they want to pick i
there was very little religion. my father wasn't religious at all. but he was really interested in the subject of, you know, the birth and growth of islam. he basically transmitted that interest to me. so when i studied history at cambridge, i did a special subject in that exactly. while i was studying it was where i came across the so-called incident of the satanic verses. >> brown: you say in the book youoted good story. >> 20 years later i find out how good a story it was. >> brown: you wrote when you finished the satanic verses you thought it was the least political of the novels you had written at the time. you were genuinely surprised at what had happened. >> i thought i was very respectful about islam. yes from a secular point of view but it talks about the birth of this religion and i thought it was pretty admiring of the person at the center of it, the prophet of islam. >> brown: what did you think you were doing? what did you think you were saying about the religion in the novel? >> most of the novel is not about religion. most of the novel is about immigration to england but these drea
the attack because the talibaned the name of religion. we have seen a reasonable amount of change this time around. because malala is a young girl, because she is teenager and a symbol against the battle of the taliban, political leaders have come out, they have spoken out against this with unequivocal condemnation this time. remember that the terrorists and these right-wing groups are a very small majority of the 180 million people living here in pakistan. >> woodruff: we also know that today pakistan's top military official, the chief of army staff general khani, went to visit her in the hospital. how significant is that? >> reporter: that's significant on a number of level, because, of course, the military s no beenble to leavethe swat valley. they still have a considerable presence, alongside the civilian administration, and the police there, to keep it protected to ensure that the taliban do not return to that area. and, of course, malala's in the civil military hospital where she's being cared for and operated on last night. general cahani's statement in particular is of interest, bec
, the largest muslim population. is that more of a question of religion or geography or when you talk about geography you're talking about religion? >> it's about technology creating new geographical communities where you can have a pan islam. my previous book was about the indian ocean. >> rose: "monsoon" as i remember. >> right and the islam in southeast asia is very diffeent --. >> rose: you talk to them and that's what they tell you. >> but because of technology muslims from one part of the greater middle east to the other part and to the muslim community in southeast asia can now interact with each other and rediscover their faith as a unit rather than a separate groups. so it creates a new geography of islam. it's still about space so each place interacts with every other so in ordeto dersnd iyou have to understand the connections and disaggregate it and understand that people become engaged about who owns the mountains in kashmir. best example is india and china. india and china, two gate civilizations, developed completely separated divided by the high wall of the himalayas. now ind
on a stage such as this. and i would like to ask you both to tell me what role your religion hasplay in your own personal views on abortion. these talk about how you came to that decision. talk about how your religion played a part in that. and please there is such an emotional issue for so many people in this country, please talk personally about this if you could. congressman ryan. >> i don't see how a person can separate their public life from their private life or from their faith. our faith inrms u in erytng wdo. my fth informs me about how to take care of the vulnerable, of how to make sure that people have a chance in life. now you why to ask basically why i'm pro-life. it's not simply because of my catholic faith. that's a factor, of course. but it's also because of reason and science. you know, i think about ten and a half years ago my wife and i went to mercy hospital in janesville where i was born for ourselve enweek ultrasound forur first rn child. and we saw that heartbeat, our little baby was in the shape of a bean. and to this day, we have nick named our first born child lizza
values in regard to the family, to religion. >> abortion. >> abortion. issues on that. >> gay marriage. they're very conservative. that's basically what changed everything. i remember reading an article where president bush was asked what was one of his biggest regrets. he said, not passing immigration reform. as a republican and having a republican congress he could not convince his ownartyo support immigration reform. we focus only on the undocumented immigrants. i think that that's -- that that's what's happening, that when people perceive latinos, first thing that pops into their mind is immigrants and undocumented immigrants or like they say illegal aliens which is a term we don't like to use. they don't realize that 74% are americans, are citizens either by birth or naturaliz. so the majorityf latinos are americans and we have a buying power of over a trillion dollars. if latinos in the u.s. were a country, we would be the 14th largest economy in the world. they're 2.5 billion businesses that are latino owned. we are a very important part of this country. we contribute very much
themselves to be protestant. that's according to a new pew study on religion in the u.s. protestants historically made up a majority of the country. now, they accou for 48% of the pulation. and one-fifth of adults in the survey had no religious affiliation. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: a new congressional report takes aim at two chinese telecommunications giants. jeffrey brown reports. these are the second and fifth largest makers of wireless telecommunication gear in the world. they're looking to expand their limited sales in the u.s. but in a 52-page report, the house intelligence committee warned monday against doing business with the chinese companies, citing concerns over corporate speen, cyber war risks and more. committee chair mike rogers. >> the investigation concluded that the risks associated with these companies providing equipment and services to u.s. critical infrastructure undermines the core u.s. national security interests. as a majority of u.s. networks are run by private companies, we recommend that private network provide
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)